Block 46 – Orenda Audio Week

Delighted to be taking part in Orenda Books’ Audio Week, where a host of awesome bloggers (and me) are reviewing the audiobook versions of some fantastic Orenda titles. Plus I’ve got *two* copies of Johana Gustawsson’s Block 46 audiobook to give away! More on that later.

Falkenberg, Sweden. The mutilated body of talented young jewellery designer, Linnea Blix, is found in a snow-swept marina. Hampstead Heath, London. The body of a young boy is discovered with similar wounds to Linnea’s. Buchenwald Concentration Camp, 1944. In the midst of the hell of the Holocaust, Erich Hebner will do anything to see himself as a human again. Are the two murders the work of a serial killer, and how are they connected to shocking events at Buchenwald? Emily Roy, a profiler on loan to Scotland Yard from the Canadian Royal Mounted Police, joins up with Linnea’s friend, French true-crime writer Alexis Castells, to investigate the puzzling case. They travel between Sweden and London, and then deep into the past, as a startling and terrifying connection comes to light.

Firstly, the story. It’s dark and often horrific, told in part through flashbacks to the Buchenwald Concentration Camp towards the end of the Second World War. The characters here are twisted and barbaric in their treatment of the prisoners, and you’re dragged along through the story of Erich Hebner as he does what he needs to do to survive. How this then links to the murder of Linnea Blix in the present, or to the murders of a young boy in London, is what drives this story.

The characters are brilliantly realised – I loved Emily Roy and Alexis Castells in particular as they unpick the unpleasant clues behind these horrific murders. There’s a real international feel to the book – written by a French author (and here translated into English by Maxim Jakubowski), with the action moving from Falkenberg in Sweden to London, with a Canadian Behavioural Insight Analyst (Roy) and a French crime writer based in London (Castells). Regular readers of this blog know of my love of books which give you a sense of place, and Block 46 delivers this in spades, across the various locations in the book.

The audiobook is narrated by Patricia Rodriguez and Mark Meadows. If I had any criticism, I found Patricia’s delivery to be a little too measured and slow. However, the great thing about the Audible app is that you can alter the speed of the narration. I found that by bumping it up fractionally to 1.25x speed, the delivery felt better for me, and I got through the book quicker – always useful when you’ve got a lot of other books to read! The shift between Rodriguez and Meadows as narrators worked really well and really gave the story an extra dimension.

Karen at Orenda Books has given me TWO copies of the audiobook to give away – leave a comment here on the blog, or retweet a link to this post – I’ll pop all the names into a random number generator next week and announce the winners on twitter. You’ll need an account at audible.co.uk though!

You can find Johana Gustawsson on twitter @JoGustawsson. Block 46 is published by Orenda Books.

Nemesister – Sophie Jonas-Hill

It’s a psychological mystery where the female protagonist stumbles into a deserted shack with no memory but a gun in her hand. There she meets an apparent stranger, Red, and the two find themselves isolated and under attack from unseen assailants.

Barricaded inside for a sweltering night, cabin fever sets in and brings her flashes of insight which might be memory or vision as the swamp sighs and moans around her.

Exploring in the dark she finds hidden keys that seem to reveal her identity and that of her mysterious host, but which are the more dangerous – the lies he’s told her, or the ones she’s told herself?

A woman with no memory of who she is. A woman with no name, with a gunshot wound and no idea where or how she got it…

Nemesister kicks off at a breathless pace and doesn’t really let up. It’s a compelling, gothic tale, told through the eyes of a character who can’t remember who she is. Flashbacks light up parts of her story, but they merely add to the confusion. Who is she? How has she got to the shack? And who is the mysterious stranger?

As the night draws in, it becomes clear that the pair are forced to spend the night together. The sense of unease begins to escalate.

Nemesister is an intriguing read. The characters are fascinating, and the setting claustrophobic and intense. Secrets are revealed gradually, but so are the lies – we’ve got an unreliable narrator, in an unreliable situation, with a distinctly unreliable companion.

It’s hard to say too much without giving away too much of the story. Suffice it to say that if you like your psychological thrillers in the american gothic style, with a hot, sticky, confined location, then Nemesister should be on your list.

Nemesister, by Sophie Jonas-Hill is published on July 6th 2017 by Urbane Publications. You can find Sophie on twitter @SophieJonasHill, or at her website The House of Crooked Sisters.

The blog tour continues tomorrow!

Exquisite – Sarah Stovell

Bo Luxton has it all – a loving family, a beautiful home in the Lake District, and a clutch of bestselling books to her name.

Enter Alice Dark, an aspiring writer who is drifting through life, with a series of dead-end jobs and a freeloading boyfriend.
When they meet at a writers’ retreat, the chemistry is instant, and a sinister relationship develops… Or does it?

So, what can we say about Exquisite? Well, for starters I read it in a day, in pretty much one sitting. I’d picked up a sampler from Karen at the Orenda Roadshow in Leeds, a tantalising glimpse to whet the appetite.

Having read the full book now, I can happily report that it does not disappoint. Exquisite is an utterly compelling domestic noir of a burgeoning friendship which takes a rather ominous turn following a writers’ retreat in Northumberland.

Told from the viewpoints of Bo Luxton, a well-established author, and Alice Dark, a young woman with dreams of becoming a writer, the two start exchanging emails following the retreat and soon become friends. Bo’s life appears to be idyllic – a gorgeous writing retreat in the Lake District, a successful writing career, a happy family. But is there something deeper, something more… sinister going on? By contrast, Alice Dark is young, a fresh-faced wannabe writer, keen to learn everything she can from her mentor.

The characters are fascinating, the scenery gorgeous, and the sense of something slightly off becomes more and more unsettling as the novel continues to grow. Shifting viewpoints tell each side of the story and gradually unravel the truth. Or do they? The concept of the unreliable narrator is familiar (and great fun), but having two people tell the same events with their own slant on what happens is unusual. It works remarkably well.

Exquisite, by Sarah Stovell is published by Orenda Books, and is available now. You can find Sarah Stovell on twitter @sarahlovescrime. Many thanks to Karen at @OrendaBooks for the review copy.

The Mayfly – James Hazel

The Mayfly by James Hazel is the first in what I’m sure will be a long-running series featuring ex-detective turned lawyer, Charlie Priest. Charlie has… issues (as all good protagonists do), but in this case they’re rather more interesting than most. He’s approached by Kenneth Ellinder, a wealthy entrepreneur, to investigate the murder of his son, Miles.

Oh, and what a murder it is. You’ll need a strong stomach for this one! Charlie and his team investigate, albeit reluctantly at first, and are swiftly drawn into a mystery dating back to the World War II and the interrogation of a Nazi surgeon. The story is interspersed with flashbacks to the questioning, and I really liked how this tied back into the story. I’d have loved to find out a little more about Colonel Ruck around that time. Perhaps a spin-off series…?

The Mayfly is a cracking psychological mystery. I loved the character of Charlie Priest – despite initial worries that he was going to be a yet another cookie-cutter ex-policeman-turned-lawyer (personal issues: check, family issues: check), he quickly grew on me with his quick thinking, smart wit and sense of humour. The plot hums along at quite a pace, sagging only slightly in the final third – there’s a romantic element which I felt kind of got in the way of the main narrative a little, but that’s more my personal preference than anything else. The supporting cast are also great – Georgie and Okoro fill out the gang nicely (more of Mr Okoro please) and Charlie’s family… well, I’ll let you find out more about them.

A sharply told tale – I look forward to seeing what Mr Priest gets up to next.

The Mayfly by James Hazel is published by @BonnierZaffre and is out now. You can find James Hazel on twitter @JamesHazelBooks

It’s happening again.

A mutilated body discovered in the woods.
A murderous plan conceived in the past.
A reckoning seventy years in the making . . .

Charlie Priest, ex-detective inspector turned London lawyer, is hired by influential entrepreneur Kenneth Ellinder to investigate the murder of his son. But Priest is no ordinary lawyer. Brilliant, yet flawed, this case will push him, and those closest to him, to the edge.

Priest traces the evidence back to the desperate last days of the Second World War. Buried in the ashes of the Holocaust is a secret so deadly its poison threatens to destroy the very heart of the establishment.
With more victims going missing, Priest realises that not everyone should be trusted. As he races to uncover the truth, can he prevent history from repeating itself?

Strange Practice – Vivian Shaw

Meet Greta Helsing, fast-talking doctor to the undead. Keeping the supernatural community not-alive and well in London has been her family’s specialty for generations.

Greta Helsing inherited the family’s highly specialized, and highly peculiar, medical practice. In her consulting rooms, Dr. Helsing treats the undead for a host of ills – vocal strain in banshees, arthritis in barrow-wights, and entropy in mummies. Although barely making ends meet, this is just the quiet, supernatural-adjacent life Greta’s been groomed for since childhood.

Until a sect of murderous monks emerges, killing human and undead Londoners alike. As terror takes hold of the city, Greta must use her unusual skills to stop the cult if she hopes to save her practice, and her life.

Meet Dr Greta Helsing, medic to the… differently alive residents of London. She looks after the capital’s supernatural inhabitants, be they vampire or vampyre (and yes, there is a difference!), ghoul, mummy or demon. The trouble is, someone is going around killing people. And that simply will not do. Dr Helsing (her family dropped the ‘van’ many years ago) must join forces with some of her patients to sort it all out.

What a splendid adventure this is – Dr Greta Helsing is a brilliant character, world-weary doctor on-call at all hours, sorting out the ills of the undead and trying to run her Harley Street practice without drawing too much (or any) attention to her patients from the living world.

The monks are delightfully evil and horribly focused on the job in hand. The underlying mystery is nicely twisty, and Dr Helsing has a splendidly quirky coterie of undead friends to aid her on her quest – Fastitocolon and Ruthven were particular favourites, and not forgetting Sir Francis. Of the supporting characters, I’d love to find out more about Anna and Dez, Greta’s helpers in her rather peculiar practice. Here’s hoping they’ll all be back for book 2 in what promises to be a splendid new urban fantasy series.

Strange Practice by Vivian Shaw will be published on July 25th 2017 by Orbit. You can find Vivian on twitter @ceruleancynic. Many thanks to Nazia at Orbit for the review copy (and the sweets – she knows the way to a bookblogger’s heart!)

Ancient Magic – Meg Cowley & Victoria DeLuis

Can a cursed relic be saved from the clutches of evil before it is used to wreak devastation?
Kukulkan’s Skull should never have existed; nothing more than a legendary relic with the death powers of a god. Deep in the ancient Mexican jungles, it has been found… and stolen.
Zoe Stark, witch and magical relic hunter, must discover who the true enemy is in time to save the skull from being used for great evil.
Time is running out, for the Day of the Dead fast approaches, when the skull will be at the zenith of its devastating power. Zoe finds much more is at stake as she chases a cold trail of murder and magic.
Her own life is in danger as the mastermind behind the theft silences those who get too close, but she cannot give up, for to fail, would be to doom millions of innocent lives.
If Zoe fails, the skull’s first victim will be her…

Rogue Magic is the first in a new series by fantasy authors Meg Cowley and Victoria DeLuis. It’s a short, snappy thrill ride through the jungles of Mexico on the trail of an ancient relic which should never have existed. It’s also great fun – I loved the character of Zoe Stark, who comes across as a mixture of Lara Croft and Indiana Jones, but with more sass, a sprinkle of sarcasm and rather more ass-kicking. There’s globe-trotting galore, seedy underworlds, evil villains and, of course, magic… What more could you want?

It’s always refreshing to see a strong female lead, and Zoe Stark is just that – taking no nonsense from anyone (well, maybe apart from her boss, sometimes!). If I had any complaint it was that the book was a little on the short side – it’s an intriguing glimpse into a new magic-infused world – the focus here is firmly on the adventure which zips along at quite a pace, but I want to find out more about the Magicai and Zoe’s next adventures! I’m sure there’ll be plenty of those to come.

Ancient Magic is out now – you can get the ebook or paperback on Amazon. Meg can be found on twitter < href=”https://twitter.com/megcowley”>@megcowley and Victoria is @DeLuisWrites. Go say hello, but go get the book first!

Killing Gravity – Corey J. White

Mariam Xi can kill you with her mind. She escaped the MEPHISTO lab where she was raised as a psychic supersoldier, which left her with terrifying capabilities, a fierce sense of independence, a deficit of trust and an experimental pet named Seven. She’s spent her life on the run, but the boogeymen from her past are catching up with her. An encounter with a bounty hunter has left her hanging helpless in a dying spaceship, dependent on the mercy of strangers.

Penned in on all sides, Mariam chases rumors to find the one who sold her out. To discover the truth and defeat her pursuers, she’ll have to stare into the abyss and find the secrets of her past, her future, and her terrifying potential.

Killing Gravity is a kick-ass, whip-smart sci-fi short story/novella/novellette(?) which is a pure joy to read. It’s short, sharp and stunningly bloody, with a fiercely independent, void-damned spacewitch as the main protagonist. Echoes of Firefly abound, with a close-knit (albeit smaller) crew on a series of adventures as Mariam ‘Mars’ Xi goes on the hunt for vengeance. For such a short book, a *lot* gets crammed into the narrative.

The cast is refreshingly diverse and *interesting*, and it features what Warren Ellis described as ‘a cute space ferret of death’. Tell me you’re not intrigued!

It’s not perfect – for me it’s a little too short, and the action, whilst fantastically realised feels perhaps a tiny bit rushed. I’d have loved to see the story breathe a little more, giving us space to discover more about Squid, Mookie and Trix. That said, this is book 1 in the Voidwitch Saga (and it was only a couple of quid for the ebook), so I’m hopeful that we’ll get some meatier tales!

For those minor niggles (one of which boils down to GIVE ME MORE, DAMNIT), I’m greatly looking forward to reading more from Corey J. White.

Killing Gravity by Corey J. White was published May 9th 2017 by Tor.com. You can find Corey over at his website, coreyjwhite.com or on twitter @cjwhite

I picked this up from a recommendation in Warren Ellis’ excellent email newsletter, Orbital Operations. I’m a sucker for a good email newsletter, and Warren’s is a fine example of the art. You should subscribe. And go follow Morning, Computer while you’re at it.